CRTC posts interactive questionnaire

As part of its ongoing “Let’s Talk TV: A Conversation with Canadians” initiative, the CRTC has released an interactive questionnaire called “Let’s Talk TV: Choicebook” inviting Canadians to provide their thoughts on the future of the country’s TV system. The questionnaire is based on feedback provided to the federal broadcast regulator during the first phase […]

As part of its ongoing “Let’s Talk TV: A Conversation with Canadians” initiative, the CRTC has released an interactive questionnaire called “Let’s Talk TV: Choicebook” inviting Canadians to provide their thoughts on the future of the country’s TV system.

The questionnaire is based on feedback provided to the federal broadcast regulator during the first phase of the “Let’s Talk TV” initiative. It is available until 8 p.m. on March 14.

The 30-minute questionnaire asks participants for their opinion on several key issues within the broadcast environment, including basic subscription services, local news, pick and pay options, signal substitution and online programming.

After determining respondents’ information (including gender, location and annual household income), the questionnaire presents a series of scenarios based on real-world examples and asks participants to state which scenario they agree with and provide a reason (up to 1,000 characters) why.

CRTC chairman Jean-Pierre Blais is also hosting a Twitter chat in both official languages today (Wednesday), answering questions about the Let’s Talk TV initiative. The chat can be viewed at @CRTCeng and @CRTCfra using the hashtag #TalkTV.

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