CRTC to meet with telecom/cable industry over paper bill fees

Fact-finding study finds “wide variance” on how such fees are approached

The CRTC plans to host a meeting with telecom and cable companies to discuss the practice of charging additional fees to customers wishing to receive paper bills, saying it wants them to come up with a “clear and predictable approach” that addresses consumer issues related to such fees.

The federal regulator said Thursday that it is “concerned” that the approach taken by the telecom and cable industries in the transition from paper to e-bills may not have taken into account the “specific circumstances” of some customers.

The federal regulator said that a fact-finding exercise on the practice of charging for paper bills found a “wide variance” on how Canadian telecom and cable companies approach these fees.

As of November 2013, 36 companies indicated that they did not charge for paper bills, while 27 companies said they charge monthly fees ranging from 99 cents to $5.95.

While certain companies do provide exemptions, such as for customers who have no internet connection, the fact-finding mission found “no consistent practice” across the industry.

Media Articles

Mona Networks takes mixed-use retail development mobile

New mobile network connects property management, office workers and retailers

Postmedia names Sid Lee agency of record

Win follows successful "Postmedia Reimagined" campaign

Corus Entertainment revenue up, adjusted earnings flat

Tough national advertising market adds pressure to revenue growth

Shaw profit beats estimates, but revenue doesn’t

Despite solid earnings, Shaw reports a drop in cable and satellite TV subscribers

The YouTubers CMOs need to meet

Four made-in-Canada YouTube channels brands should become acquainted with

Bell and Rogers in disagreement over NHL GamePlus mobile app

Canada's biggest media companies face off over access to NHL content

Fashion Magazine launches awards show

Inaugural event caps off annual World MasterCard Fashion Week

TVB disputes IAB’s ad spend figures

Television marketing body says numbers unfairly include digital spend on traditional media including broadcast and print

Rogers partners with Netflix on original series

Between starts filming in Toronto this fall