Family Channel turns on new look

Astral is bouncing a new look for its Family Channel on to TV screens today. The new brand refresh coincides with the launch of Family Channel HD available for Bell Satellite and Roger Communications customers. “As part of the new look, the Family logo bounces, floats and pops. It never sits quietly on a shelf […]

Astral is bouncing a new look for its Family Channel on to TV screens today.

The new brand refresh coincides with the launch of Family Channel HD available for Bell Satellite and Roger Communications customers.

“As part of the new look, the Family logo bounces, floats and pops. It never sits quietly on a shelf but bursts with life and energy,” said Heather Senst, vice-president, creative services, in a release. “Through our new look our viewers are instinctively reminded of the fun, surprising and relatable nature of their favourite Family shows.”

Specific elements include new animated on-air IDs based on the Family logo. For now, Family.ca includes elements of the on-air creative, though a new site is planned for late February.

The just launched Family Channel HD includes programming that mirrors standard definition Family Channel, including Disney shows such as JONAS L.A., Good Luck Charlie and Wizards of Waverly Place as well as the high definition Fish Hooks and Pair of Kings.

Media Articles

Giving marketers the inside edge

SPONSORED: In-app video from Flurry and its marketplace now available to Yahoo advertisers

Yahoo Canada’s Year in Review

SPONSORED: Tapping in to what matters most to users

The search for social marketing’s J.D. Power

Aimia CMO John Boynton says social marketing needs metrics that look deeper

Canada’s Hottest Ads: A very foodie November

...with a light dusting of holiday cheer

Toronto Star hires Rethink

Agency to focus on promoting the paper's print edition and tablet news products

Former Quebecor CEO to head St-Hubert restaurant chain

Robert Depatie starts new role in February

Why there needs to be a victor in the mobile wallet wars

Retail Futurist Doug Stephens says convenience will reach a tipping point