Google introduces credit card to ad clients

Google is giving some of its advertisers George Costanza wallet syndrome. The technology and search company, which makes 96% of its revenue from advertising, has just launched a credit card for a selection of its U.S. advertising clients. The AdWords Business credit card offers a credit line and no annual fee. The annual percentage rate […]

Google is giving some of its advertisers George Costanza wallet syndrome.

The technology and search company, which makes 96% of its revenue from advertising, has just launched a credit card for a selection of its U.S. advertising clients.

The AdWords Business credit card offers a credit line and no annual fee. The annual percentage rate on the MasterCard product is 8.99% and it’s issued through the World Financial Capital Bank.

But this isn’t your typical piece of plastic—it’s only to be used to purchase search advertising on Google.

It’s the first time Google has ventured into vendor financing and, in a Reuters story, Google VP of global online sales Claire Johnson outlined the benefits of the card for small- and medium-sized businesses. These companies may not have the resources to launch a large campaign leading up to a major sales season since they are often cash flow-strapped, she said.

“Many of them are trying to grow a business without the kind of means that, say, your classic company has,” she said.

Google e-mailed some of its advertising customers—the exact number wasn’t revealed—an invitation about the card on Wednesday as part of a beta trial.

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