Google unveils its new tablet called Nexus Seven

Google is unveiling a small tablet computer bearing its brand. Called the Nexus Seven, the tablet will have a screen that measures 7 inches diagonally, smaller than the nearly 10 inches on Apple Inc.’s popular iPad. That means it’s more likely to challenge Amazon.com Inc.’s Kindle Fire, which is also 7 inches. The Nexus Seven will […]

Google is unveiling a small tablet computer bearing its brand.

Called the Nexus Seven, the tablet will have a screen that measures 7 inches diagonally, smaller than the nearly 10 inches on Apple Inc.’s popular iPad. That means it’s more likely to challenge Amazon.com Inc.’s Kindle Fire, which is also 7 inches.

The Nexus Seven will run the next version of Google Inc.’s Android operating system, called Jelly Bean. The tablet is also designed specifically for Google Play, the company’s online store for movies, music, games, books and apps. Google said Wednesday that Google Play will now offer movies for sale, rather than only rentals.

A Google expansion into the tablet market brings another imposing entrant into what is already a battle of tech heavyweights. Last week, Microsoft Corp. announced its own tablet, Surface. Expected to go on sale this fall, Surface will run on a revamped version of Windows and compete directly with the iPad.

Though the tablet carries the Google brand, the machine will be made by AsusTek Computer Inc. Google also recently expanded into the device-making business with its $12.5 billion acquisition of Motorola Mobility, but the company has stressed that it intends to continue to rely on Asus and other manufacturers that have embraced Android.

There are already other Android-powered tablets on the market, but none have proven nearly as popular as the iPad or Kindle Fire. That has raised worries at Google as more people rely on tablets to go online.

If Apple and Amazon establish themselves as the dominant tablet makers, they could set up their operating systems in ways that de-emphasize Google’s internet search engine and other services. Apple develops its own system, while Amazon modifies Android for use in Kindles.

Apple already has announced that the next version of the iPad operating system will abandon Google’s digital maps as the built-in navigation system. That shift could cause neighbourhood merchants to spend less money advertising on Google.

Earlier Wednesday, Google unveiled a new search tool to help users get the right information at the right time on their mobile device. Called Google Now, the tool will be part of Jelly Bean, which will be available in mid-July. Some devices, including the Galaxy Nexus, will get the upgrade automatically over the air.

With Google Now, if you say “traffic,” for example, it will look at your usual commute to work and show you alternative routes if there’s a lot of traffic. It will tell you the scores of your favourite sports teams automatically, and it will keep you up to date on flight statuses if you are traveling. Google Inc. said the Google Now feature will get smarter the more you use it.

Jelly Bean will also come with the ability to share photos by tapping two phones together, using an emerging wireless technology called near-field communications.

Media Articles

Conventional TV revenues fall $46 million in 2015: CRTC

Local and national airtime sales decline, but remain relatively stable

TSO getting in tune with digital

A quarter of its media budget now devoted to digital, with plans to break the 30% threshold next year

Raptors win caps monster weekend for Sportsnet

Four telecasts top 1 million-viewer mark

Drake takes flight over Toronto

Aerial banner promotes rapper's newest album, Views

Sport Chek celebrates Raptors’ win in timely fashion

Out-of-home campaign celebrating victory launches within minutes of final buzzer

Videology’s Q1 report shows shifting objectives in video ads

'Canada Video Market At-A-Glance' also shows marketers buying in on mobile video

YouTube launches six-second ad format

Bumper format pitched as ideal, unskippable solution for mobile-first audiences

NY senator: ‘Spying billboards’ may violate privacy rights

Clear Channel Outdoor Americas' Radar program called into question

Of course Russell Simmons is opening his own ad agency

The in-house content route is best taken by media who aren't brand-friendly otherwise