Google’s Q4 earnings climb 7% as online ad spend rises

Google says its fourth-quarter earnings rose 7% as online advertisers spent more money in pursuit of holiday shoppers. The results announced Tuesday were slightly above analyst estimates. It wasn’t an apples-to-apples comparison because the most recent quarter included Motorola Mobility, which Google Inc. didn’t own in the previous year. Things were further complicated by Google’s […]

Google says its fourth-quarter earnings rose 7% as online advertisers spent more money in pursuit of holiday shoppers.

The results announced Tuesday were slightly above analyst estimates.

It wasn’t an apples-to-apples comparison because the most recent quarter included Motorola Mobility, which Google Inc. didn’t own in the previous year.

Things were further complicated by Google’s recent agreement to sell a part of its Motorola Mobility division that makes cable TV boxes. That division is now accounted for as a discontinued operation.

Google earned nearly $2.9 billion, or $8.62 cents per share during the final three months of last year. That compared to net income of $2.7 billion, or $8.22 per share, at the same time last year.

Revenue surged 36% from the previous year to $14.4 billion.

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