Halifax’s Chronicle Herald resigns from NADbank

Halifax daily The Chronicle Herald announced Wednesday that it has resigned from the Toronto-based newspaper readership organization Newspaper Audience Databank (NADbank), effective immediately. In a bluntly worded release, the independently owned publication said it is moving to a more timely research method that provides “more accurate representation” of a growing suite of products that includes […]

Halifax daily The Chronicle Herald announced Wednesday that it has resigned from the Toronto-based newspaper readership organization Newspaper Audience Databank (NADbank), effective immediately.

In a bluntly worded release, the independently owned publication said it is moving to a more timely research method that provides “more accurate representation” of a growing suite of products that includes community weeklies, magazines and digital platforms.

The company announced that it has partnered with Corporate Research Associates, a Halifax company with 36 years of experience, to develop research methods that ensure the “most up to date” readership information possible on its product mix, as well as more accurate representation of various market segments.

Mark Lever, The Chronicle Herald’s president and CEO, said that NADbank’s methodology and sample size does not accurately represent the company’s multiple product mix and the “unique market” it serves.

NADbank president Anne Crassweller did not immediately respond to Marketing’s request for comment.

Last year, NADbank and its magazine readership counterpart, Print Measurement Bureau, announced they would merge and jointly produce a new print and digital study.

The two bodies were responding to industry pressure to produce more timely readership data, as well as much sought-after information, including the role media brands play in the path-to-purchase, engagement metrics and measurement of the total brand footprint.

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