Infographic: Good News, Bad News (for news)

Not surprisingly, students today get most of their news from one of the many screens in front of them, but don’t count out ink-on-paper because it’s still enticing Gen Y eyeballs. In conjunction with Canadian youth marketing and market research firm Studentawards Inc., Marketing surveyed 1,078 students between 18 and 24 to find out where […]

Not surprisingly, students today get most of their news from one of the many screens in front of them, but don’t count out ink-on-paper because it’s still enticing Gen Y eyeballs.

In conjunction with Canadian youth marketing and market research firm Studentawards Inc., Marketing surveyed 1,078 students between 18 and 24 to find out where they source their news, and specifically about their newspaper and magazine reading habits.

While their primary news feeds are online, more than half (53%) still pick up a print newspaper at least once a week (even if only for a few minutes). And although 63% believe print newspapers will disappear in the next 10 years, when it comes to searching for news, it’s their local newspapers (whether in print or online) they turn to the most.

Click to enlarge, or download the PDF here.

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