Infographic: Good News, Bad News (for news)

Not surprisingly, students today get most of their news from one of the many screens in front of them, but don’t count out ink-on-paper because it’s still enticing Gen Y eyeballs. In conjunction with Canadian youth marketing and market research firm Studentawards Inc., Marketing surveyed 1,078 students between 18 and 24 to find out where […]

Not surprisingly, students today get most of their news from one of the many screens in front of them, but don’t count out ink-on-paper because it’s still enticing Gen Y eyeballs.

In conjunction with Canadian youth marketing and market research firm Studentawards Inc., Marketing surveyed 1,078 students between 18 and 24 to find out where they source their news, and specifically about their newspaper and magazine reading habits.

While their primary news feeds are online, more than half (53%) still pick up a print newspaper at least once a week (even if only for a few minutes). And although 63% believe print newspapers will disappear in the next 10 years, when it comes to searching for news, it’s their local newspapers (whether in print or online) they turn to the most.

Click to enlarge, or download the PDF here.

Media Articles

The show about nothing heads to Bell Media’s ‘Project Latte’

Seinfeld joins The Big Bang Theory, The Goldbergs, The Millers and Spun Out

CFL takes to the skies with Canadian North

League unveils new flying “billboard” in advance of 102nd Grey Cup

Transcontinental bets on local with sale of consumer titles

Company focuses on maintaining its competitive advantage

Content marketing veteran launches new B2B play

New venture combines business-to-business focused journalism with B2B-focused content marketing

Dairy Farmers of Canada and W Network’s cheesy campaign

Holiday effort from m2 targets ‘zestfuls’

Coors looks to score with Yahoo fantasy football initiative

Multi-faceted marketing program includes display, native ads, takeovers and search

Why advertisers continue to use print flyers

New study finds print flyers remain widely read, inspire consumer action