Newsweek ending its print publication

The U.S. news magazine Newsweek plans to end its print publication after 80 years and will shift to an all-digital format starting in early 2013. Job cuts are expected. Newsweek’s last U.S. print edition will be its Dec. 31 issue. With more and more consumers on the go and using their cellphones and tablets to […]

The U.S. news magazine Newsweek plans to end its print publication after 80 years and will shift to an all-digital format starting in early 2013. Job cuts are expected.

Newsweek’s last U.S. print edition will be its Dec. 31 issue.

With more and more consumers on the go and using their cellphones and tablets to receive the news, media organizations have had to increasingly shift more of their emphasis online. Aside from Newsweek, SmartMoney announced in June that it was shuttering its print publication in favour of a digital format. Dow Jones & Co., a unit of News Corp., said at the time that 25 positions at SmartMoney would be eliminated.

Newsweek‘s decision does not come as a complete surprise. Barry Diller, the head of the company that owns Newsweek, announced in July that the publication was examining its future as a weekly print magazine. Diller said then that the brand was good around the world, but that producing a weekly news magazine in print form wasn’t easy.

The announcement of the change was made by Tina Brown, editor-in-chief and founder of The Newsweek Daily Beast Co., on The Daily Beast website Thursday.

Brown said staff cuts are expected, but didn’t give a specific figure.

Brown said that the online publication will be called Newsweek Global and will be a single, worldwide edition that requires a paid subscription. It will be available for tablets and online reading, with certain content available on The Daily Beast website.

Media Articles

How to break blind brand loyalty

A new study unveils how brands can disrupt tech habits and win new consumers

Social Scanner: Analytics are the next step for young social networks

Plus a look into the collateral damage in Facebook's click-bait crackdown and why brands should think before jumping on Snapchat

Telco SaskTel buys naming rights for Saskatoon arena

The company is paying $350,000 per year for the naming rights

Shomi: how Rogers and Shaw plan to take on Netflix

The service launches this fall and will be available across multiple devices.

French cooking magazine Ricardo launches in English

Publisher promises advertisers a minimum circulation of 50,000

Ottawa Senators make headlines with new CMO hire

Longtime newspaper executive Peter O’Leary starts his new position Sept. 22

Pinty’s takes over TSN curling sponsorship

Adds curling to list of sports sponsorships including Toronto Blue Jays and NASCAR