Social Scanner: Coca-Cola’s user generated ad

Social media news marketers must have

Coca-Cola’s user generated ad

For its latest ad, Coca-Cola tapped the power of the crowd. Throughout the spring, it collected video clips of young consumers showing what it feels like when they take a sip of Coke – the “AHH” moments, as the brand calls it.

After collecting more than 400 submissions via the #ThisIsAhh hashtag on Instagram, Vine, Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr, the brand’s agency, Wieden + Kennedy, selected 40 and cut them into a 30-second TV spot that debuted during the season finale of American Idol.

The ad is part of the brand’s first all-digital campaign, a longstanding effort under the “Ahh” umbrella that targets teens. The campaign initially launched in April 2013, and its microsite, Ahh.com, received over 4 million views in six months.

This isn’t the first time consumer-generated content from social media has made its way to television. Last fall Trident tapped popular Vine users to create super-short vids that were turned into a TV spot that aired on Fuse. Dunkin Donuts similarly put one of its Vines on TV, though it chose a brand-created vine rather than one created by a consumer or a social media influencer.

Twitter’s best for brand love

Consumers have more love for brands on Twitter than other social networks, according to a new study by the social media consultancy firm Converseon. The study found that more than half (55%) of conversations about the 20 leading global brands considered were positive. Another 25% were neutral, leaving just 20% negative. By comparison, 49% of conversations about those same brands on Facebook were positive (versus 20% negative) and 53% were positive on Google+ (versus 18% negative).

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The Numbers

Digiday has crunched the numbers on the cost – and opportunity – of engaging Vine and Instagram stars. Here’s a look at what it costs to work with influencer  on the platforms and the results they can deliver.

$10,000

Cost for a popular Instagrammer like Anastasia Ashley (468,843 followers) to post a brand-related photo

$75

Cost for less-coveted Instagrammers, like Christine Hsu (170,295 followers), to post a brand-related photo

10%

Amount InstaBrand, a company that facilitates deals between brands and influencers, takes from each transaction

1,000

Instagram influencers represented by Cycle, a division of the social media agency Laundry Service that also brokers brand / influencer deals

13,000

Average number of engagements (likes, comments) on a post by Kyle Kuiper, a popular Instagrammer who often works with brands

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