Social Scanner: IKEA turns Instagram into a website

Plus, Facebook's emotional troubles and Barbie joins LinkedIn

IKEA has turned its Instagram feed into a website. IKEA mobile screengrab

The retailer’s Russian operation tapped the ad agency Instinct to create a fully functional website on the mobile app to promote its PS 2014 furniture collection.

To create the “site,” IKEA posted photos of furniture in categories such as benches, tables and storage. When consumers click on a photo, they’ll see the tags for each item in the photo, each of which has its own Instagram account. If they then click on a tagged item, they’re taken to another account where they’ll see more photos of the individual item, along with prices and product information.

“We wanted to create something really cool. And then we noticed similarities between Instagram tags and website links. And then IKEA PS Collection 2014 was introduced,” Instinct creative director Nikolay Fabrika told Digiday.

Since launching on June 21, the account has gained over 13,000 followers.

The initiative recalls a Pinterest campaign by the Japanese retailer Uniqlo that flooded the social network with pictures to create a takeover that similarly looked like a website.

Recently, the Toronto-based restaurant Pizzeria Libretto also found a unique way to use Instagram, photographing its pizzas then cropping them into nine shots, posted to create large photos across its Instagram page.

Facebook’s emotions experiment is a PR miss

On Wednesday, Facebook addressed the emotion-based experiment it ran that has caused an uproar on the social web. Speaking to a journalist from New Delhi TV on a trip to India, COO Sheryl Sandberg said the experiment was “communicated very badly,” stressing that Facebook “will not try to control emotions of users.” While her pledge may help diffuse the controversy, much of the PR damage is already done, with publications all over the world reporting on the story and researchers condemning the lack of proper consent. In the U.K., regulators are also investigating whether the site broke data privacy laws, another hit for a company that regularly lands in the news over privacy concerns.

Barbie joined LinkedIn

Barbie is the latest, uh, user to join LinkedIn. To promote its new “entrepreneur” Barbie, the toy maker Mattel has signed the classic toy up for its own LinkedIn account. She’s getting the VIP treatment over at LinkedIn, too, which has set the doll up with an influencer page consumers can follow rather than the standard account. Playing off of business trends, the page states, “My new business is “Dream Incubator” where I act as a consultant, helping girls around the world play out their imagination, try on different careers, and explore the world around them.” To date, the doll has 2,700 followers.

Auto brands tap influencers

Two big auto brands are working with influencers on new marketing campaigns. To promote its new “Dream Ride” interactive video campaign, Lincoln has tapped Bravo TV host and executive Andy Cohen, as well as the band Johnnyswim and auto journalist / dad blogger Kimatni Rawlins to post Lincoln “Dream Ride” content on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Meanwhile AutoTrader is working with YouTuber Laina Morris – a.k.a. the Overly Attached Girlfriend. Morris stars in an ad for the site in which she looks for a new car so her boyfriend won’t notice her when she’s stalking him.

The Numbers

How big is social commerce? eMarketer crunched the numbers for its freshly released Social Commerce Roundup. The numbers are U.S. only, but they provide a good roadmap for where social commerce is – and where it’s headed.

37%
Marketers who said social sharing (ie: social media logos and links on a page) is an effective marketing tactic.

29%
Marketers who said user comments, reviews and ratings are an effective marketing tactic.

28%
Consumers who said daily deals sites lead them to buy products they’ve never bought before – more than product reviews, brand emails, retailer emails or search engines.

$65
Average on a purchase sparked by an Instagram post.

$55
Average, by comparison, on a purchase sparked by a Facebook post.

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