Social Scanner: Moms are the most social audience

Plus, should your brand be on Ello?

Canadian moms are super social. They spend more time on social media and share more content than both dads and people without children, according to a new report from Olive Media and ShareThis.

ShareThis observed the social behaviour of more than 4.1 million consumers and found that per month, moms in Canada spend an average of 617 minutes on social media. That’s compared to 529 minutes for dads, 522 minutes for women without children and 420 minutes for men without children.

For brands, moms are also potentially powerful brand advocates, with an average of 26 clickbacks per content share – almost double that of the general population.

ShareThis found that L’Oreal, Kleenex, Dove and Tampax are among the most-discussed brands for moms, with moms sharing 868,000 pieces of L’Oreal-related content during the three month period.

Unsurprisingly, home and family care is the type of content moms are most likely to share on social media, followed by beauty and personal care. Categories like automotive, business and travel courted far fewer shares.

The time of day moms spend on social was also shown in the study, which found moms are more likely to share in the morning, with sharing on social peaking between noon and 2:00 pm.

Do you need to be on Ello?

When a new social network gains momentum, there’s a rush to jump on the bandwagon. Ello, a Tumblr/Twitter hybrid that’s still in beta, is the latest to benefit from a boom with 15,000 signups per hour at one point last week.

Should brands join the migration? The short answer is no. Why? Ello doesn’t want them there. The site is anti-advertising, even penning a manifesto declaring that other social networks are “owned by advertisers.”

Plenty of young companies have declared this kind of thing before – Tumblr comes to mind – only to turn around and take brands’ dollars when it came time to return cash to investors, so this could easily change down the road. But for now, the signal to brands is clear: stay out.

Twitter’s turning TV moments into GIFable moments

Until June, consumers couldn’t post GIFs on Twitter. They could post links to GIFs, but the looping format wouldn’t display in the timeline. Three months after it made the switch and started supported GIFs, Twitter’s has integrated them into its ad offering.

Using SnappyTV (a live video company Twitter acquired in June), brands can take clips from broadcast and turn them into GIFs, which are then “brought to” Twitter users by a brand using Twitter Amplify. For example, during the recent broadcast of Fashion Rocks TV, Fashion Rocks Live tweeted this very GIFable moment – a Jennifer Lopez hair flip. Though no brand was associated, the tweet perfectly illustrates how TV moments can translate to Twitter-friendly GIFs.

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The Numbers

Facebook fans are a huge asset for retailers and grocers, according to a recent study by the shopper social media company Collective Bias. Here’s a by-the-numbers look at how social can influence customer behaviour.

50%

Percentage more that fans of a retailer on Facebook spend over non-fans

$1,000

Low end amount that customers who post on a grocer’s Facebook page spend in a year

95%

Percentage more that fans of a grocer on Facebook spend annually over non-fans

56

The number of times fans of a grocer on Facebook visit that store annually

7%

Percentage more times than male Facebook fans visited a store they liked over female fans

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