Tapstream’s Taps.io offers mobile user tracking

Vancouver’s Tapstream has created a new URL shortening service designed to show app publishers the source of their users. Released Thursday, Tapstream’s Taps.io creates custom URLs that monitor traffic to app websites and show which users actually download the app. Slaven Radic, the company’s co-founder, said the idea is to show which marketing channels drive […]

Vancouver’s Tapstream has created a new URL shortening service designed to show app publishers the source of their users.

Released Thursday, Tapstream’s Taps.io creates custom URLs that monitor traffic to app websites and show which users actually download the app. Slaven Radic, the company’s co-founder, said the idea is to show which marketing channels drive downloads. If, for example, most of an app’s users downloaded it after clicking on a Twitter link, the publisher may want to invest in marketing on that channel.

The company’s services are aimed at app development companies, ad agencies and app publishers, many of whom make apps for major brands. When the company launched in May 2012, two of its first big clients were Bleacher Report and Hootsuite.

One of the big challenges in promoting apps is a lack of analytics. Apple’s App Store and the Google Play store both have data fences that don’t show attribution data, meaning app makers have limited ways of seeing how users found them. Tapstream’s goal is to illuminate that pathway.

The company also tracks in-app behaviour, so publishers can see which users make in app purchases, how often they open the app, what features they use and how long each visit is. By using the Taps.io service, publishers can then see where their most engaged users come from.

“That’s the holy grail: to be able to connect an engaged user to the source where they came from,” Radic said. “If the publisher knows where they are, they can acquire more.”

The in-app behaviour is also of particular interest to marketers, many of whom are hoping their apps lead to purchases (many of which still occur in offline retail space). Radic uses the food industry as an example. “If you’re a fast food chain, you want to see people using the app, clicking on the map and locating the nearest location. That’s the kind of engagement brands want,” he said.

Media Articles

A&W brings its ‘Burgers to Beat MS’ campaign to Snapchat

The initiative marks the QSR's first campaign on the platform

Breaking down millennial viewing audiences

Numeris spotlights viewing habits for three distinct millennial sub-groups

Star Media Group’s chief revenue officer departs

Kirk MacDonald had joined the company last October to oversee integrated sales

Canadians show CBC some love after Hip telecast

4.1 million Canadians feel more favourable towards the broadcaster in wake of concert

Patrick Jutras joining La Presse as sales VP

Longtime sales executive praises company's 'high-calibre' executive team

Visa tops list of Olympic sponsors (Report)

Nearly one third of Canadian viewers noticed the brand on an unaided basis

Carat Montreal announces new executive appointments

Savard and Verdon to lead efforts to become a '100% digital economy business'

CRTC’s Super Bowl simsub order: A goal-line fumble (Column)

Are U.S. ads truly 'integral to the event,' as the regulator suggests?

Rogers Radio partners with Shazam on content play

Booster Juice signs on as the inaugural sponsors of The Shazam @ 7 Countdown