Today’s Parent redesigns

There’s nothing more real life than a three-year-old with night terrors or a picky tot that won’t let citrus pass her lips. So, in an effort to pack Today’s Parent with more real-life stories, the monthly magazine recently underwent a redesign. Starting with its March issue, Today’s Parent—which is published by Rogers Publishing, as is […]

There’s nothing more real life than a three-year-old with night terrors or a picky tot that won’t let citrus pass her lips.

So, in an effort to pack Today’s Parent with more real-life stories, the monthly magazine recently underwent a redesign.

Starting with its March issue, Today’s Parent—which is published by Rogers Publishing, as is Marketing—has boosted the community factor in its pages. The magazine is trying to strike a “happy balance” between using experts such as pediatricians and input from parents, said Karine Ewart, editor-in-chief at Today’s Parent.

Focus groups and other research showed that readers wanted to hear more real-life stories and readers’ voices. “Being relatable and creating a sense of community became key with us,” she said.

“We’re really working on the sense of play,” she added. “You don’t want to pick up a parenting magazine and feel intimidated. You want to feel like you’re part of a larger group of people who know exactly what you’re going through and gain some solace out of that.”

Publisher Rosemary Munroe said a lot of the architecture and flow of the magazine has been refreshed. With a circulation of 160,000, she said “we’ve got a lot of loyal readers and we wanted to make sure we were still attracting those readers, but also expanding our audience a bit wider.”

To help entice new readers, the food section, for instance, has been overhauled. (“Between [the topics of] sleep and food, we couldn’t possibly write enough articles,” said Ewart.) The food section now contains fast, simple recipes complete with images and a grocery list to make shopping easier. “It’s for the busy lifestyles of parents today,” she said.

There’s also now more lifestyle-focused content including fashion, beauty, travel and finance, “something we’ll be highlighting to all of our advertisers,” said Munroe.

In terms of flow, the front of the book contains shorter pieces – quick-hit tips and trends – that Ewart said parents can read “even if they only have a few minutes because their kids are on the ice and they only have five minutes before they need to be somewhere else.”

Longer pieces that can be read “when parents have the luxury of time” round out the content mix, she added.

This content is now available on more platforms as well thanks to an iPad app the magazine launched Wednesday. In turn, “We’re excited to bring new integrated advertising opportunities across all of the Today’s Parent platforms now,” said Munroe.

A commercial for Today’s Parent made in-house at Rogers began its run last week on Rogers broadcast properties across Canada and will continue until mid March, said senior marketing and communications associate Hazel Picco.

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