Toronto Star and The Onion part ways

After only a year together, the Toronto Star is pulling the plug on its partnership with The Onion. “The reason we’re doing this is economic pressures resulting in declining ad revenues,” Bob Hepburn, a spokesman for the Star, told Marketing. The Star has handled advertising rights, sales, printing and distribution for the Canadian version of […]

After only a year together, the Toronto Star is pulling the plug on its partnership with The Onion.

“The reason we’re doing this is economic pressures resulting in declining ad revenues,” Bob Hepburn, a spokesman for the Star, told Marketing.

The Star has handled advertising rights, sales, printing and distribution for the Canadian version of the free weekly paper since 2011.

The Toronto edition marked the first time a print version of The Onion was distributed outside the U.S. It is still available in 13 markets including New York, Chicago and Denver.

The Toronto version of The Onion included pop culture content from the A.V. Club (an entertainment newspaper and website published by The Onion) as well as local stories.

For the Canadian launch, the A.V. Club hired an editor to source Toronto-specific copy from freelancers. This individual has been let go, said Hepburn, but there have been no other job losses.

The last Toronto-made Onion print issue will appear July 26.

Media Articles

Giving marketers the inside edge

SPONSORED: In-app video from Flurry and its marketplace now available to Yahoo advertisers

Yahoo Canada’s Year in Review

SPONSORED: Tapping in to what matters most to users

The search for social marketing’s J.D. Power

Aimia CMO John Boynton says social marketing needs metrics that look deeper

Canada’s Hottest Ads: A very foodie November

...with a light dusting of holiday cheer

Toronto Star hires Rethink

Agency to focus on promoting the paper's print edition and tablet news products

Former Quebecor CEO to head St-Hubert restaurant chain

Robert Depatie starts new role in February

Why there needs to be a victor in the mobile wallet wars

Retail Futurist Doug Stephens says convenience will reach a tipping point