Vidéotron launches French-language video streaming service

Netflix has a new competitor in Québec and Ontario. Vidéotron has announced the launch of Illico Club Unlimited, a video-on-demand service available by subscription. While Netflix is available in Québec, one has to dig deep to find content in French even in the Canadian Movies section. Starting Feb. 23, Illico Club Unlimited will provide mainly […]

Netflix has a new competitor in Québec and Ontario. Vidéotron has announced the launch of Illico Club Unlimited, a video-on-demand service available by subscription.

While Netflix is available in Québec, one has to dig deep to find content in French even in the Canadian Movies section. Starting Feb. 23, Illico Club Unlimited will provide mainly French-language content for $9.99 per month (Netflix costs $7.99) and, like Netflix, offer a free one-month trial.

Users won’t have to be a Videotron client to subscribe, but those who are will be able to access a program catalogue directly from channel 900. The service will also be accessible through desktop computers and Android devices.

Illico Club Unlimited will offer movies and television series from local producers and distributors, with big studios such as Sony, MGM, CBS, Films Séville, TVA Films and Alliance represented as well. Radio-Canada will also contribute content.

Media Articles

Giving marketers the inside edge

SPONSORED: In-app video from Flurry and its marketplace now available to Yahoo advertisers

Yahoo Canada’s Year in Review

SPONSORED: Tapping in to what matters most to users

The search for social marketing’s J.D. Power

Aimia CMO John Boynton says social marketing needs metrics that look deeper

Canada’s Hottest Ads: A very foodie November

...with a light dusting of holiday cheer

Toronto Star hires Rethink

Agency to focus on promoting the paper's print edition and tablet news products

Former Quebecor CEO to head St-Hubert restaurant chain

Robert Depatie starts new role in February

Why there needs to be a victor in the mobile wallet wars

Retail Futurist Doug Stephens says convenience will reach a tipping point