AutoUpdate: Yahoo might launch its own YouTube

Reports say Yahoo plans to lure video producers from YouTube by offering a larger cut of ad revenue

The week in programmatic buying and ad tech at a glance

Does Yahoo have a YouTube rival in the works?
Anonymous sources quoted in Advertising Age say Yahoo is working on a video portal similar to YouTube or Vimeo, which will be integrated across Yahoo web and mobile properties. Yahoo plans to lure video producers from YouTube by offering a larger cut of ad revenue and fixed-rate deals worth 50-100% more than those on offer at YouTube; Ad Age says Yahoo is even courting Google Preferred producers, whose videos rank among the most popular 5% on the site. (And if that wasn’t enough rumour for you, Adweek says Amazon has secret plans for a music streaming service to compete with Beats, while GigaOm claims Google will launch Android TV at Google I/O this month.)
Read more about Yahoo’s video portal at Advertising Age.

Datalogix rakes in $45 million funding round
Third-party data provider Datalogix has earned $45 million in Series C funding, bringing it to a total of $112 million. Datalogix specializes in connecting offline CRM data with digital user identities, in order to build fuller profiles of online consumers. The company says it plans to use the funds to expand internationally, and to build out its product in mobile, search and video.
Read the story (plus an interview with CEO Eric Roza) at Ad Exchanger

Nielsen says it will include mobile in people meter studies
Nielsen has started recruiting participants in its TV ratings sample who use smartphones and tablets to watch online video. The company has not yet said how mobile participation would affect its TV ratings methodology, leading to some worries that panelists may become overloaded with responsibilities. A notice sent to Nielsen clients promised a “full rollout” of mobile measurement services by April 2015 – likely later than most advertisers were hoping.
Read more at Media Post

InMobi, NativeX launch native mobile exchanges
Mobile ad network InMobi has launched a native advertising exchange, using technology licensed from the Rubicon Project. The network claims its exchange offers access to 759 million monthly unique users across 30,000 apps, including Tango, NBC and ABC properties. The announcement follows another launch earlier last week from NativeX, with a much tighter focus on mobile gaming. NativeX’s gaming ads will include typical native banner and interstitial ads, as well as rewards-based ads similar to those offered by Vancouver-based Kiip.
Read more on InMobi at Adweek and on NativeX at Media Post

Financial Times, Rocket Fuel face off over bot traffic report
According to the Financial Times, a recent Mercedes-Benz campaign handled by DSP Rocket Fuel was overrun by fraud. The article (paywall) focuses on an analysis done by ad verification firm Telemetry, which sampled 365,000 impressions over three weeks of the campaign, and found 57% of the traffic came from bots. Rocket Fuel took exception to FT’s “sensationalized headlines,” pointing out that the sample only represented a small part of the campaign – which, according to the client, had only 6% suspicious traffic overall. The FT report notes that Mercedes and its Omnicom-held agency continue to work with Rocket Fuel, though they’ve received a refund for the suspect impressions.
Read more at Exchange Wire

Conde Nast creates 4,000-word bible for native advertising
The publisher of The New Yorker and Wired Magazine has put together a document that’s being called the “Magna Carta” of native ads. Put together by editorial director Tom Wallace, it codifies policy around legal and privacy issues, including how to handle consumer data. Hopefully it can finally answer the question: What actually counts as native advertising?
Read more at Advertising Age

Around the web

The week’s best features and opinion

Is big data helping or hurting the shopper experience? (Media Post)
A survey from McCann’s Truth Central finds that consumers worry data-assisted shopping is too good at giving them what they want

Hype watch: Does native advertising really perform as well as editorial? (Digiday)
Chartbeat’s analysis of sponsored content throws suspicion on publishers’ claims about its stellar performance

Everything you know about frequency is wrong (Ad Exchanger)
Most viewers see online ads far too much, or barely at all. But we can fix it

The Wall Street Journal shares best practices for video ads (eMarketer)
Head of global advertising Troy Fellows says WSJ video ads will never be sold on an exchange or network

The ad tech threat agencies need to take seriously (Digiday)
VivaKi’s Marco Bertozzi warns against “releas[ing] all of your intellectual capital to an external company where the same rules expected of an agency may or may not apply”

Advantage Articles

Why we said no to Do Not Track (Column)

Users should be given more control, but current proposal has too many flaws

Yahoo expands mobile toolkit with acquisition of Flurry

Startup is the latest in a wave of smaller acquisitions

Self-serve vs. Managed: Should a tech partner run your campaign?

As brands and agencies demand more transparency of their tech partners and look to cut costs, the software-as-a-service model is starting to make a lot of sense

Reaching a digital audience in a multi-device world

SPONSORED POST: Shannan LaMorre, VP Olive Elite+, shares insights

Apple turns to IBM for help in selling to corporate customers

Apple wants a better understanding of biz customers while IBM expects access to broader marketplace

Follow the Data

SPONSORED CONTENT: Exchange Lab's Roberta Houle shares insights on campaign tactics

30 brands volunteer for ANA sting operation

Association of National Advertisers teams up with ad security specialists White Ops to produce benchmark report on cyber crooks and fraudsters

Time to talk about rebates in programmatic

Programmatic trading has made auditing rebates a complicated affair